He wasn’t called “Jerry”

In October 2015 Mr Chameoeun (“Jimmy”) Soun was hired to undertake $7,000.00 worth of work at a property in Cranbourne, Victoria. He did not provide the property owner with a formal contract and took a deposit of greater than 10%. Later that year he was also hired to build a laundry (which he did without obtaining a building permit) and a carport valued at $6,000.00 for which he again did not enter a contract. He was not a registered builder.

building meme
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Mr Soun was charged with a number of breaches of the Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995 and the Building Act 1993, including §29 of the former, which at the time provided that

A builder must not enter into a major domestic building contract unless … the builder is registered as a builder under the Building Act 1993, in the case of a natural person … Penalty:100 penalty units.

A ‘major domestic building contract’ was defined as one where the contract price exceeded $5,000.00 (subsequently raised to $10,000.00).

Mr Nuon opted neither to appear nor be represented at the hearing of the charges. In his absence the Dandenong Magistrates Court convicted him and imposed a fine of $5,000.00 plus costs.

Victorian Building Authority v Nuon (2019) Cranbourne Star-News, 7 February 2019, p.3

… and a sack marked ‘swag’!

Sometimes offenders go the whole hog on their brand of crime.

swag
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From August 2016 to September 2017 a woman from Corio, Australia engaged in a series of property crimes against four elderly men.  The crimes spanned theft, aggravated burglary, robbery and obtaining property by deception.  One of the crimes included stealing a credit card from a disability pensioner; another victim was an 80 year old.  The circumstances might be inferred from the definition of “robbery” in §75 of the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.):

A person is guilty of robbery if he steals, and immediately before or at the time of doing so, and in order to do so, he uses force on any person or puts or seeks to put any person in fear that he or another person will be then and there subjected to force. … A person guilty of robbery … is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to level 4 imprisonment (15 years maximum).

The defendant pleaded guilty in Geelong Magistrates Court.  McGarvie M imposed a sentence of four years imprisonment with a non-parole period of three years.

The defendant has lodged an appeal against her sentence in the County Court of Victoria.

Police v Elston (2018) Geelong Advertiser, 16 April 2018, p.7.